Dominion of Canada in Irish Political Discourse

As part of my research on the Irish War of Independence (1919-1921) for my interdisciplinary History and Gender Studies MA at Concordia, I read a transcription of the debates that took place as Irish MPs discussed whether to accept the terms Great Britain offered during a period of truce: Ireland will accept dominion status, or war would resume.  The story of the Dominion of Canada – created by the Constitution Act of 1867 – provided a framework through which Irish politicians articulated concerns about Ireland’s prospective political status.   The comparative language surrounding topics like national identity, the Oath of Allegiance, and constitutional usage highlights how Canada as a Dominion was a key concept in negotiating Irish statehood, showcasing how Canada’s political history within the British Empire was important to other nations’ paths to independence.
Dominion of Canada in Irish Political Discourse

Gabrielle Machnik-Kekesi

Concordia University

Montreal, Quebec

The story of Canada provided a framework for Irish politicians to articulate concerns about Ireland’s prospective political status.

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